5 ways to cut cord clutter

Categories: Blog | Posted: September 11, 2014

Excessive extension on power outlet

We rely on electricity, which means we have cords. And we love our electronics, which means we also have cables. These long and winding connectors make all this possible in our technology-driven lifestyle, but that doesn’t mean we want to look at or trip over them.

If you’re tired of the unsightly tangle, here are 5 ways to cut cord clutter.

  1. Hide and don’t seek. Get creative with your decorating. Use accents to block out the sight of cords and cables. Hide them behind a row of books on a shelf or place a large planter, basket, or other container on the floor in front of them. Mask hanging cords with an upright item, like a vase.
  2. Creatively cover them. Do a search for “cord covers” and you’ll find all sorts of creative solutions for hiding cords and cables. From up high to down low, you can choose from colorful to classic looks for anything the is climbing the walls, ceilings, or floors, and anywhere in between. You can also craft a sleeve with a piece of fabric that matches or coordinates with your décor. Just fold it lengthwise with the right sides facing one another, and sew the raw edges together, leaving the two ends open. Then insert your cord through the opening.
  3. Go to the source. When deciding where to place anything that needs a cord or cable connection, look for the outlets first. The closer you can get to the source of the electricity, the less cord you’ll have to conceal.
  4. Nip and tuck. If you have long, winding cords and cables getting in the way, fold up the excess and secure it in place with a zip tie, covered wire, or piece of Velcro. You can always pull out more length as needed, but you don’t expose them unnecessarily.
  5. Pull the plug. Manufacturers recognize the value of wireless technology, so they’re creating more items that can operate without a web of cords and cables. Laptops, printers, satellite television, and even lamps can operate wirelessly.

Get your cords and cables under control so you can improve the aesthetics and safety of your home.

Martha Clifford

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